IPhoneography Challenge: Nature

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Good morning from a dark Hastings.  The sun hasn’t come up yet .  So that means the days are now getting shorter, and the nights longer.  It is also cooler in the mornings too.  Summer is on it’s way out.

Another week, another iPhoneography challenge hosted by Lens and Pens by Sally

These photos were taken with the my 4S outside our local bank.  I had just pulled up in the car park when I notice this monarch butterfly and immediately got out the phone and started taking photos.  It didn’t like what I was doing so flew off.  I started to put the phone away when it came back again.  So out came the phone again.   Much to the disgust of my son who was with me.  He shrunk down into his seat and wanted to disappear.  He was so embarrassed.  Luckily for him no-one was around to see this.

The second time around I was able to up close a bit more using the zoom on it to get these photos.

Here are a couple of great blogs to check out.

Phoneography Monday Challenge: Nature

http://lensandpensbysally.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/phoneography-challenge-your-phone-as-your-lens-celebrating-the-one-year-anniversary-and-natures-abundance/

http://completelydisappear.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/under-the-flowers-beneath-the-sky/

Thanks for visiting.

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Sundays Stills Challenge: Things we take for granted,

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Good evening from Hastings.

This is quite a thoughtful challenge by Ed at  Sunday Stills .  I asked my husband about what he takes for granted.  Well the list was long.  In the end I settled for petrol.  We take it for granted that it will always be around for us.  But for our great grandchildren or even earlier if we are not careful it could be in short supply.

I chose this as my husband has a gas guzzler –

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This 2972 Pontiac Firebird. His pride and joy.  But boy it is thirsty.  Not to mention hard on batteries as well with it’s V8 engine.

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Even these cars were thirsty.

Even coal is getting to be somewhat limited as many coal mines have closed down.  That means that even steam engines would have a hard time in the future.

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This steam engine was used to clear rubble after the 1931 earthquake which I had posted today.

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If we are not careful we will end up using this form of transport again.

Thanks for visiting and here are some other great blogs to check out.

http://sundaystills.wordpress.com/2014/02/02/sunday-stills-the-next-challenge-things-we-take-for-granted/

http://shyraven23.wordpress.com/2014/02/02/sunday-stills-things-we-take-for-granted/

http://nadiamerrillphotography.wordpress.com/2014/02/02/sunday-stills-things-we-take-for-granted/

http://bastet1952.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/mountain-details-sunday-stills/

http://esengasvoice.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/sunday-stills-challenge-things-we-take-for-granted/Final watermark for blog

Remembering the 1931 Earthquake in Hastings

Today is the 83rd anniversary of the Hawke’s Bay Earthquake that devastated the region

Here is some information from http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/historic-earthquakes/page-6

Page 6 – The 1931 Hawke’s Bay earthquake

In 1931, New Zealand’s deadliest earthquake devastated the cities of Napier and Hastings. At least 256 people died in the magnitude 7.8 earthquake – 161 in Napier, 93 in Hastings, and 2 in Wairoa. Many thousands more required medical treatment.

256 or 258?

The official death toll of the Hawke’s Bay earthquake is 256. But there are 258 names on the memorial, and this unofficial number is likely to be correct.

On Tuesday morning, 3 February 1931, at 10.47 a.m., the ground in the Hawke’s Bay region heaved sharply upward and swayed. A deceptive half-minute pause was followed by a downward motion and violent shaking and rocking. In all, the quake spanned two and a half minutes.

Here are some photos from Hastings this morning.

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Different speakers, the mayors of both Napier and Hastings, Reverend Numia Tomoana and local historian Michael Fowler.

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Pipers coming from different directions.

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Some of the few survivors left still alive.

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Laying a wreath for those who died.

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Replicas of the papers in the aftermath of the disaster.

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There are some tragic stories.  One was a baby only 3 weeks old.

A time to reflect on this disaster and remember those lost.  But it is a time of hope and recovery as it has made Hastings and Napier into a beautiful Art Deco centre.

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