Floral Friday: Begonias

Good morning from a sunny Hastings.  Everyone is now into the New Year so I hope you all had a good time celebrating the New Year.

I had a lovely day yesterday doing what I love the most.  I spent an hour at Cornwall Park taking photos.  It was a busy place with lots of families just enjoying the sunshine and each other.  The birds were loud but because of all the people they hid in the trees.  Except a few sparrows that came down to fight for the bread with the ducks.

These begonias are on display at the hot house.  It was sweltering inside but I endured it as the colours were just amazing.

Begonia is a genus of perennial flowering plants in the family Begoniaceae. The genus contains about 1,400 different plant species. The Begonias are native to moist subtropical and tropical climates. Some species are commonly grown indoors as ornamental houseplants in cooler climates. In cooler climates some species are cultivated outside in summertime for their bright colourful flowers, which have sepals but no petals.

The different groups of begonias have different cultural requirements, but most species come from tropical regions, so they and their hybrids require warm temperatures. Most are forest understory plants and require bright shade; few will tolerate full sun, especially in warmer climates. In general, begonias require a well-drained growing medium that is neither constantly wet nor allowed to dry out completely. Many begonias will grow and flower year-round except for tuberous begonias, which usually have a dormant period. During this dormant period, the tubers can be stored in a cool, dry place. Begonias of the semperflorens group (or wax begonias) are frequently grown as bedding plants outdoors. A recent group of hybrids derived from this group is marketed as “Dragonwing” begonias; they are much larger both in leaf and in flower. Tuberous begonias are frequently used as container plants. Although most Begonia species are tropical or subtropical in origin, the Chinese species B. grandis is hardy to USDA hardiness zone 6 and is commonly known as the “hardy begonia”. Most begonias can be grown outdoors year-round in subtropical or tropical climates, but in temperate climates, begonias are grown outdoors as annuals, or as house or greenhouse plants.

So a little information courtesy of Wikipedia.

FFF

http://nowathome.wordpress.com/2015/01/01/floral-friday-coneflower/

Thanks for visiting.

Cheers

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