WPC Challenge: Afloat

Follow the Leader (1 of 1)

Good morning from a rather grey Hastings morning.

My daughter arrived safe and well yesterday and it was great to see her again.  Even better still she got some results from her first assignment and one was an ‘A’ and the other a
‘B-‘ so she is over the moon.  One could say she was floating on cloud nine.

So onto the weekly challenge set by The Daily Post which is afloat.  Last weekend I went to Anderson Park for some photos of the black swans.  Even though the light was very dark for being the middle of the afternoon I still managed to get some good shots. This is almost a monochrome image with a splash of colour – though I haven’t edited it much.

Under the Water (2 of 1)

And here is a fish floating in the pond in the hot house at Cornwall Park.  Just another splash of colour.

https://nowathome.wordpress.com/2015/04/10/afloat/

https://bopaula.wordpress.com/2015/04/10/afloat/

https://piecesofstarlight.wordpress.com/2015/04/10/wpc-afloat-below-and-above/

The Daily Post: Weekly Photo Challenge – Afloat

https://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2015/04/10/weekly-photo-challenge-afloat/

#FridayFoto: Look Again (Keep Their Memories Afloat)

Meadowlark Botanical Gardens Fish

https://zainabjavid.wordpress.com/2015/04/10/weekly-photo-challenge-afloat/

Fashion Conscious Fish

Thanks for visiting.

Copyright Raewyn Forbes

17 thoughts on “WPC Challenge: Afloat”

  1. Pingback: Afloat | nowathome
      1. I haven’t really seen any white ones here, just these ones but they are beautiful and graceful, but were somewhat aggressive when I didn’t bring any food with me.

        Like

      2. LOL. Swans only LOOK sweet. They are all nasty. Geese can be very aggressive too and they run in packs — and they are much bigger than we expect. And stronger, too.

        The original mute swans were brought over from England in the 18th or 19thcentury. Our native swans are trumpeter swans, though there’s considerable disagreement whether or not they ever bred in New England. Those black swans are your native swans and as far as I can tell, don’t live anywhere else. They are a close relative of the mute swan. It’s possible we didn’t have a native swan species here and that’s why they brought the mute swans from England. In any case, they have thrived. They can be found almost everywhere now. They look like your swans, but are all white (brown as babies, turning lighter until adulthood).

        Liked by 1 person

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