Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: Post Processing Challenge – Panoramas

Rainbow-

Good evening from a cool Hastings day.

I must apologise for being really late with my post today.  Tuesdays are my days for my painting class.  So, I managed to wake up at a decent hour but when I went onto my computer the Internet was down yet again.  Sooooo, it was a matter of eating breakfast at a leisurely pace before heading out.  Hopefully I won’t have too many interruptions.

This week, being the 5th Monday/Tuesday in June it is time to show our post processing for Sally’s challenge at Lens and Pens by Sally.  My image is actually 2 images merged using the panorama feature in Lightroom.  I tried to do a panorama shot with the camera but managed to cut off the rainbow above the tree.  It should be with apps but I never quite got there.

I think it is a good image for this week, after hearing what has been happening in the US.  So this post is for you Horty at It Is What It Is.

And here is another of my paintings.

Monarch Butterfly-8796

Not the best, but I am getting there.  Very slowly.

https://lensandpensbysally.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/sally-ds-mobile-photography-challenge-editing-and-processing-blurred-lines-part-one/

https://piecesofstarlight.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/for-sally-ds-lens-and-pens-processing-challenge/

https://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/sally-ds-mobile-photograph-challenge-editing-and-processing-with-various-apps/

As it is later in the day and I am tired I will catch up with you all tomorrow morning.

Thanks for visiting.

Copyright Raewyn Forbes

Cee’s Oddball Challenge: Odd One Out.

A Red Poppy Among the Orange Poppies-594

Good morning from a cool but sunny Hastings day.

So it is now the last Monday in June.  Where has the time gone?  The year is nearly half over.

So, even though it is Sunday for Cee at Cee’s Photography , it is time for her wonderful challenge. This is where we get to showcase those great photos that don’t seem to fit any category but are still good to work on.

For a change I am showing this photo taken last Friday.  Among the sea of orange poppies there was this pink poppy.  So the odd one out.

Cee’s Odd Ball Photo Challenge: 2015 Week 26

https://woollymuses.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/cees-odd-ball-challenge-15wk-26/

Binnaz and Sefil – Hers and His

https://nowathome.wordpress.com/2015/06/28/cees-odd-ball-photo-challenge-2015-week-26/

https://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2015/06/28/cees-oddball-photo-challenge-2015-week-26-high-on-the-hills-was-a-lonely-goat-heard/

022714-odd-ball

Thanks for visiting.

Copyright Raewyn Forbes

Travel Theme: Miniature Roses

Minature Roses-376

Good afternoon from a warm and sunny Hastings day.

Please excuse my tardiness.  I have just changed Internet Providers and they spent the morning tweaking our internet.  I suppose they thought that no-one would be awake before midday in this household, and therefore are not online.  Well they got that wrong.  So I have just done some editing and then sat in the sun to paint.  Now it is a case of watching paint dry.  But the internet is now back on and a tad faster – methinks.  My son is just over the interruption and now couldn’t care less about the speeds – which he normally does.

Anyway onto Ailsa’s challenge over at Where’s my backpack?, which this week is tiny things.

So here are some miniature roses taken on Friday at the Frimley Rose Gardens.

Minature Rose-388

These are not true macros.  But the roses were about the size of an old New Zealand 50 cent piece – about 3 cm or just over an inch and a bit in diameter.

Minature Rose-386

I just used the macro setting on my camera, just to enable me to focus right up close and then braved the thorns to get right up close to them.

Poppy-630

But for this bee, I stood well back and zoomed on it.  The bees were just a little too active for my liking last Friday.

Travel theme: Tiny

https://woollymuses.wordpress.com/2015/06/28/travel-theme-tiny/

https://geophiliac.wordpress.com/2015/06/27/tiny/

Thanks for visiting.

Copyright Raewyn Forbes

WPC: Muses in Nature

European Goldfinch-316

Good morning from a warmer, sunnier Hastings day.

This week  from The Daily Post has asked us what inspires us.  What do we take a lot of photos of.

My muse is nature.  Yesterday I took a group of lovely ladies to Frimley Park to enjoy the sunshine and to find the last of the summer roses.  We had a fabulous time wandering around and taking photos.  I find it so hard to tear myself away from it all.  There is always that last photo you just can’t not take.  Sounds weird but I am sure everyone knows what I mean. First up I found this European Goldfinch hiding among the roses.

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There were still a lot of late roses.

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Mostly yellow and pink roses.

Rose-335

But even before we left the Heretaunga Women’s Centre I couldn’t resist taking some photos of the poppies in the frost.

Poppy-033

And then after we had finished I had to take some more photos of the poppies in the sun.

Poppy-553

Poppy-503

And there were a lot of bees so I had to take photos of them too.

Poppy-630

Poppy-581

The other ladies haven’t done much in the way of taking photos – I took over 700 in all – I shocked them I think.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/muse/

https://piecesofstarlight.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/wpc-albany-water-beach-is-my-muse/

https://zainabjavid.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/weekly-photo-challenge-muse/

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Muse

Study in Fuschia at Green Spring Gardens

#FridayFoto: A Muse From Behind

https://bopaula.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/a-fuoco/

https://nadiamerrillphotography.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/weekly-photo-challenge-muse/

The Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge: Muse

https://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/weekly-photo-challenge-muse-going-home/

Light as Inspiration

Thanks for visiting.

Copyright Raewyn Forbes

Friday Florals: Nepenthes

Nepenthes-101

Nepenthes (/nɨˈpɛnθz/), popularly known as tropical pitcher plants or monkey cups, is a genus of carnivorous plants in the monotypic family Nepenthaceae. The genus comprises roughly 150 species, and numerousnatural and many cultivated hybrids. They are mostly liana-forming plants of the Old World tropics, ranging from South China, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines; westward to Madagascar (two species) and the Seychelles(one); southward to Australia (three) and New Caledonia (one); and northward to India (one) and Sri Lanka (one). The greatest diversity occurs on Borneo, Sumatra, and the Philippines, with many endemic species. Many are plants of hot, humid, lowland areas, but the majority are tropical montane plants, receiving warm days but cool to cold, humid nights year round. A few are considered tropical alpine, with cool days and nights near freezing. The name “monkey cups” refers to the fact that monkeys have been observed drinking rainwater from these plants.

Nepenthes-103

Description

Nepenthes species usually consist of a shallow root system and a prostrate or climbing stem, often several metres long and up to 15 m (49 ft) or more, and usually 1 cm (0.4 in) or less in diameter, although this may be thicker in a few species (e.g. N. bicalcarata). From the stems arise alternate, sword-shaped leaves with entire leaf margins. An extension of the midrib (the tendril), which in some species aids in climbing, protrudes from the tip of the leaf; at the end of the tendril the pitcher forms. The pitcher starts as a small bud and gradually expands to form a globe- or tube-shaped trap.[3]

Basic structure of an upper pitcher

The trap contains a fluid of the plant’s own production, which may be watery or syrupy, and is used to drown the prey. Research has shown this fluid contains viscoelastic biopolymersthat may be crucial to the retention of insects within the traps of many species. The viscoelastic fluid in pitchers is especially effective in the retention of winged insects.[4] The trapping efficiency of this fluid remains high, even when significantly diluted by water, as inevitably happens in wet conditions.[5]

The lower part of the trap contains glands which absorb nutrients from captured prey. Along the upper inside part of the trap is a slick, waxy coating which makes the escape of its prey nearly impossible. Surrounding the entrance to the trap is a structure called the peristome (the “lip”) which is slippery and often quite colorful, attracting prey, but offering an unsure footing. The prey-capture effectiveness of the peristome is further enhanced in moist environments, where condensation may cause a thin water film to form on the surface of the peristome. When wet, the slippery surface of the peristome causes insects to ‘aquaplane’, or slip and fall, into the pitcher.[6] Above the peristome is a lid (the operculum); in many species, this keeps rain from diluting the fluid within the pitcher, the underside of which may contain nectar glands which attract prey.[3]

Nepenthes species usually produce two types of pitchers, known as leaf dimorphism. Appearing near the base of the plant are the large lower traps, which typically sit on the ground. The upper or aerial pitchers are usually smaller, coloured differently, and possess different features from the lower pitchers. These upper pitchers usually form as the plant reaches maturity and the plant grows taller. To keep the plant steady, the upper pitchers often form a loop in the tendril, allowing it to wrap around nearby support. In some species (e.g.N. rafflesiana), different prey may be attracted by the two types of pitchers. This varied morphology also often makes identification of species difficult.[3]

Prey usually consists of insects, but the largest species (e.g. N. rajah and N. rafflesiana) may occasionally catch small vertebrates, such as rats and lizards.[7][8] There are even records of cultivated plants trapping small birds.[9][10] Flowers occur in racemes or more rarely in panicles with male and female flowers on separate plants. They are insect-pollinated, the primary agents being flies (including blow flies, midges, and mosquitoes), moths, wasps, and butterflies.[11] Their smells can range from sweet to musty or fungus-like.[12] Seed is typically produced in a four-sided capsule which may contain 50–500 wind-distributed seeds, consisting of a central embryo and two wings, one on either side (though see N. pervillei).

The genus is cytologically diploid, with all studied species having a chromosome number of 2n=80.[13][14] This high number is thought to reflect paleopolyploidy (likely 8x or 16x).

https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Nepenthes

Friday's Florals

Thanks for visiting.

Copyright Raewyn Forbes