Friday Florals: Liliac

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Good morning from a calm spring day here in Hastings.

We have had a late spring this year, what with all that rain and the cold temperatures.  So now all the flowers are out and putting on such a show.  I have started to go for a walk every day.  It is a difficult time if I don’t have my camera with me.  But then the walk is supposed to be a brisk one, not stopping and starting for taking photos.  What a dilemma.  Yesterday the clouds were amazing.  I got half way around and the battery died so that made the walk slightly easier.  But then again it was very windy which makes taking photos of blooms that much harder.

What doesn’t come through in the photos is the delicious scents of all the different plants.  It is heavenly.  At the moment the lilacs are out in full force.

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And the smell is divine when I walk past them.

Here is some info courtesy of Wikipedia:

Syringa vulgaris (lilac or common lilac) is a species of flowering plant in the olive family Oleaceae, native to the Balkan Peninsula, where it grows on rocky hills.[1][2][3] This species is widely cultivated as an ornamental and has been naturalized in other parts of Europe (UK, France, Germany, Italy, etc.) as well as much of North America. It is not regarded as an aggressive species, found in the wild in widely scattered sites, usually in the vicinity of past or present human habitations.[4][5][6]

Syringa vulgaris is a large deciduous shrub or multi-stemmed small tree, growing to 6–7 m (20–23 ft) high, producing secondary shoots (“suckers”) from the base or roots, with stem diameters of up to 20 cm (8 in), which in the course of decades may produce a small clonal thicket.[7] The bark is grey to grey-brown, smooth on young stems, longitudinally furrowed and flaking on older stems. The leaves are simple, 4–12 cm (2–5 in) and 3–8 cm broad, light green to glaucous, oval to cordate, with pinnate leaf venation, a mucronate apex and an entire margin. They are arranged in opposite pairs or occasionally in whorls of three. The flowers have a tubular base to the corolla6–10 mm long with an open four-lobed apex 5–8 mm across, usually lilac to mauve, occasionally white. They are arranged in dense, terminal panicles 8–18 cm (3–7 in) long. The fruit is a dry, smooth brown capsule, 1–2 cm long, splitting in two to release the two winged seeds.[1][8]

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Friday's Florals

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