Monochrome of the Day: Roses 19

Roses--19

Monochrome of the Day

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: B’s & W’s

Napier moments

Beach Moments

Bees

A busy bee.

Water Drops Water Drops-2 Water Drops-3 Waterdrops

And some water drops on leaves and petals.

Check out Cee’s Photography    ceenphotography.com for more information.

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Friday’s Florals: Sweet Peas

Sweet Peas

Good morning from another hot summer’s day here in Hastings.

Whenever I see sweet peas I immediately think of biology and genetics at school – remember learning about dominate and recessive genes.  So here is some info from Wikipedia about  Gregor Mendel:

 Gregor Mendel is today recognized as the “Father of Modern Genetics” for his work with the cross breeding of pea plants (Pisum sativum) with different characteristics, and sweet pea has been used in a similar way. The sweet pea is thus a model organism being used in early experimentations in genetics, particularly by the pioneer geneticist Reginald Punnett. It is highly suitable as a genetic subject because of its ability to self-pollinate and its easily observed Mendelian traits such as colour, height and petal form. Many genetic principles were discovered or confirmed in this species. It was used by Punnett in early studies of genetic linkage.[8] Complementary factor inheritance was also elucidated in sweet peas, from the cross of two pure-breeding white strains which gave rise to a blue hybrid, the blue colour requiring two genes derived independently from the two white parents.[9]

Sweet Peas-2

Sweet peas have been cultivated since the 17th century and a vast number of cultivars are commercially available. They are grown for their flower colour (usually in pastel shades of blue, pink, purple and white, including bi-colours), and for their intense unique fragrance. They are grown by gardeners for private consumption or for exhibition, and in the floristry trade. The large, pea-shaped seeds are sown in cold frames in Spring or Autumn. The seeds benefit from pre-soaking or chipping with a sharp blade. The plants are also available later in the season, as young plants or plugs. They are grown up canes, with the new shoots being regularly pinched out to promote a bushy habit and higher flower yields. Plants typically reach heights of 1-2m, with the flowers appearing in midsummer and continuing for many weeks if regularly deadheaded. [4]

I love the smell of these colourful flowers.  So heavenly.

Friday's Florals

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