Animal Friend of the Week: Nyla

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Just enjoying the later afternoon sun.

In the wild

IUCN: Least concern

Nyala are medium-sized antelopes native to southern Africa. Females and young are distinctly red with white stripes, and males are a darker brown with spiral horns.

Hunting and habitat loss are major threats to wild Nyala, and over 80% of the total population is protected in national parks and sanctuaries.

The Nyala at Wellington Zoo are part of a regional breeding programme for these beautiful animals.

Wellington Zoo

The nyala is mainly active in the early morning and the late afternoon. It generally browses during the day if temperatures are 20–30 °C (68–86 °F) and during the night in the rainy season. As a herbivore, the nyala feeds upon foliage, fruits and grasses, with sufficient fresh water. A shy animal, it prefers water holes rather than open spaces. The nyala does not show signs of territoriality, and individuals areas can overlap each others. They are very cautious creatures. Old males live alone, but single sex or mixed family groups of up to 10 individuals can be found. These inhabit thickets within dense and dry savanna woodlands. The main predators of the nyala are lion, leopard and Cape hunting dog, while baboons and raptorial birds hunt for the juveniles. Mating peaks during spring and autumn. Males and females are sexually mature at 18 and 11–12 months of age respectively, though they are socially immature until five years old. After a gestational period of seven months, a single calf is born.

The nyala’s range includes Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, and Zimbabwe. It has been introduced to Botswana andNamibia, and reintroduced to Swaziland, where it had been extinct since the 1950s. Its population is stable and it has been listed as ofLeast Concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The principal threats to the species are poaching and habitat loss resulting from human settlement. The males are highly prized as game animals in Africa.

Thanks Wikipedia.

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

We are heading into spring here and I just adored Sonya’s spring lamb and mum.

Sonyvdg: Animal Friend of the Week

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: A Rothschild Giraffe

 

 

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The Rothschild’s giraffe was first named and described by Lord Walter Rothschild, a pasisonate zoologist and member of the Rothschild family. Lord Rothschild described his giraffe following an expedition to East Africa in the early 1900s.
The Rothschild’s giraffe is sometimes also known as the Baringo giraffe or the Ugandan giraffe.he wild

Facts about the Rothschild Giraffe

In the Wild

IUCN: Endangered

The Rothschild’s Giraffe is one of the most endangered subspecies, with only a few hundred remaining in Kenya and Uganda as a result of mass deforestation.

You can help protect their wild homes by purchasing sustainable timber and paper products marked with the FSC (Forestry Stewardship Council) logo.

So sad that this majestic and beautiful animal is on the verge of extinction.  It makes me angry when I see photos of young teenagers shooting any giraffes for that matter for sport.  Time to stop this barbaric practice.  Future generations will only know that these graceful creatures by photos.

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: A Sumatran Tiger

 

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In the wild

IUCN: Critically endangered

Tigers are solitary animals, with males and females only coming together for mating. Cubs stay with their mother and have no contact with their father.

Sumatran Tigers are the smallest of the five remaining sub-species, and are found on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. They are critically endangered due to habitat loss and illegal hunting, and there are believed to be less than 500 surviving in the wild.

Wellington Zoo is proud to support 21st Century Tiger, a zoo-based conservation initiative that supports wild tiger populations around the world.

 

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: A Regal Cheetah

A Regal Cheetah-

 

Cheetah are best known for their incredible speeds and are able to reach 100kph in 3 seconds. Their bodies are well adapted for this: they have non-retractable claws, a long heavy tail to help with turning, and they’re much leaner than other big cats.

In the wild 

IUCN: Vulnerable

Cheetah may be fast, but they’re non-confrontational animals and regularly have their kills stolen by other big cats.

They’re also incredibly vulnerable to conflict with farmers, as they are seen as a threat to their livestock and can be shot as a result.

Wellington Zoo contributes to their conservation by supporting Cheetah Outreach’s Livestock Guarding Dog Project – an initiative that works to resolve Cheetah and human conflict in South African farmlands by training Anatolian Shepherd Dogs to chase wild Cheetah away from the livestock they protect, ensuring the cats’ survival.

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: Sun Conures

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Sun Conures are very social and are known for their very loud squawks and screams compared to their comparatively small size – so you’ll probably hear them when you’re out and about in the Zoo.

Some of our flock were hand-reared after being rejected by their mother, andhese birds in particular are very friendly with the staff who raised them.

In the wild

IUCN: Endangered

Sun Conures, also known as Sun Parakeets, are native to northeastern South America. They form monogamous pairs as young as four months old, live in large flocks, and can live up to 30 years.

Their bright and beautiful colouring, combined with their intelligence and curious temperaments, make Sun Conures popular pets.

Unfortunately, they are now endangered and in decline primarily due to excessive trapping for the pet trade – which means that there are more Sun Conures living as pets than in the wild. They are now protected under the Wild Bird Conservation Act which bans the importation of wild–caught birds, and conservationists hope this will help to increase their numbers in the wild.

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: Kunekune Pigs

Enjoying the sun

The kunekune /ˈknɪknɪ/[1] is a small breed of domestic pig from New Zealand. Kunekune are hairy, with a rotund build and may bear wattles (or piri piri) hanging from their lower jaws. Their colour ranges from black and white, to ginger, cream, gold-tip, black, brown and tricoloured. They have a docile, friendly nature, and – like the pot-bellied pig – are now often kept as pets.

Wikipedia – Kunekune

In the wild

DOC: Rare

Not much is known about how Kunekune came to New Zealand, but we think they were brought from Asia by whalers or traders. Maori gave them their name, which means ‘fat and round’.

By the 1980s, only an estimated 50 purebred Kunekune remained. They have since recovered into the thousands due to a well organised breeding programme, and today there are breed societies in both New Zealand and the United Kingdom. 

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week:Cunningham’s Skink

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Time to showcase a reptile this week for my animal friends challenge.  Going through the reptiles on Wellington Zoo’s website I realised that I must go back again as I missed so many.  Many of them were incognito – I never saw them, all I saw or so it seemed was empty glass cages.

This is Spitfire, a female Cunningham’s Skink. She was poking her face out to see who was around.

In the wild

IUCN: Least concern

The Cunningham’s Skink is a large lizard native to southeastern Australia, and is often confused with its lookalike Blue-Tongued cousins.

They live in groups and give birth to litters of live young instead of laying eggs.

Wellington Zoo

And thanks to Sonya for taking part last week.  She was lucky enough to catch a seal in the wild.

Sonyavdg: Animal Friend of the Week:Seal 

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.