Cee’s Oddball Challenge: A Hidden Bug

Hidden Bug-2

Good morning from a very wet, cold and miserable Hastings day.  Winter has well and truly arrived here in New Zealand with snow falling in both the North Island and South Island.  It has been a cold and miserable weekend anyway but I think this is to last all week.  We have been so lucky with the warm sunny autumn days so it is to be expected.

As it is Monday for me it is time for Cee’s Oddball Challenge at Cee’s Photography.  This photo was taken a few days ago at Frimley Park.  The hydrangeas have been fighting the weather with showing some flowers.  I love the textures with this bloom as it showed the ravages of the cold nights.  Then when I go home and uploaded the photos I notice that there is a tiny bug in the middle of it.  Can you find it?

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Cee’s Odd Ball Photo Challenge: 2015 Week 21

https://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/cees-oddball-photo-challenge-2015-week-21-sculpted/

Broken and Unwanted

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Copyright Raewyn Forbes

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WPC Challenge: Ephemeral

Hydrangea

Good morning from a dark Hastings day.  We are still in summer time and I have a feeling that we are supposed to change back tonight but we haven’t had any notices about it.  I remember as a child there would be signs every where, ads on TV and in the paper.  Not now.  We just get told on the day.  Too bad if you don’t read the paper.  Nothing on TV at all.

Photography is all about catching that perfect light.  The perfect composition, the perfect subject.  It is about grabbing the moment.  I am trying to go to the parks on a regular basis to document so to see how the seasons are changing.  I haven’t been able to walk much at all over the summer so I have changed my diet and am making the effort to walk.  Every time I go to Cornwall Park the light is different, it also depends on when I go as well.  So for me it means on the hunt for that magical moment when the light hits on anything such as this hydrangea.

Autumn leaves

Autumn leaves

Then there is the light highlighting the autumn colours.

Dead leaves

And then there are the dead leaves in the water.  Once these photos were taken the light will never be the same and the leaves and petals will be different.  That is what I love about photography – always after the elusive light and shot.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/ephemeral/

The Daily Post: Weekly Photo Challenge – Ephemeral

https://bopaula.wordpress.com/2015/03/27/ephemeral/

Weekly Photo Challenge Freshly Ephemeral

Spring Thaw #photography

https://zainabjavid.wordpress.com/2015/03/27/weekly-photo-challenge-ephemeral/

#FridayFoto: One Moment In Time…

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Copyright

Floral Friday: Hydrangeas

Hydrangea (/hˈdrn(i)ə/;[1] common names hydrangea or hortensia) is a genus of 70-75 species of flowering plants native to southern and eastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, the Himalayas, and Indonesia) and the Americas. By far the greatest species diversity is in eastern Asia, notably China, Japan, and Korea. Most are shrubs 1 to 3 meters tall, but some are small trees, and others lianas reaching up to 30 m (98 ft) by climbing up trees. They can be either deciduous or evergreen, though the widely cultivated temperate species are all deciduous.[2]

Having been introduced to the Azores, H. macrophylla is now very common, particularly on Faial, which is known as the “blue island” due to the vast number of hydrangeas present on the island.

Species in the related genus Schizophragma, also in Hydrangeaceae, are also often known as hydrangeas. Schizophragma hydrangeoides and Hydrangea petiolaris are both commonly known as climbing hydrangeas.

There are two flower arrangements in hydrangeas. Mophead flowers are large round flowerheads resembling pom-poms or, as the name implies, the head of a mop. In contrast, lacecap flowers bear round, flat flowerheads with a center core of subdued, fertile flowers surrounded by outer rings of showy, sterile flowers. The flowers of some rhododendrons can appear similar to those of some hydrangeas, but Rhododendron (including azalea) is in a different order.

Cultivation and uses

Hydrangeas are popular ornamental plants, grown for their large flowerheads, with Hydrangea macrophylla being by far the most widely grown with over 600 named cultivars, many selected to have only large sterile flowers in the flowerheads. Some are best pruned on an annual basis when the new leaf buds begin to appear. If not pruned regularly, the bush will become very ‘leggy’, growing upwards until the weight of the stems is greater than their strength, at which point the stems will sag down to the ground and possibly break. Other species only flower on ‘old wood’. Thus new wood resulting from pruning will not produce flowers until the following season.

Hydrangeas are moderately toxic if eaten, with all parts of the plant containing cyanogenic glycosides.[8] Hydrangea paniculata is reportedly sometimes smoked as an intoxicant, despite the danger of illness and/or death due to the cyanide.[9][10]

In Japan, ama-cha,甘茶 meaning sweet tea, is another herbal tea made from Hydrangea serrata, whose leaves contain a substance that develops a sweet taste (phyllodulcin). For the fullest taste, fresh leaves are crumpled, steamed, and dried, yielding dark brown tea leaves. Ama-cha is mainly used for kan-butsu-e (the Buddha bathing ceremony) on April 8 every year—the day thought to be Buddha’s birthday in Japan. Ama-cha is poured over a statue of Buddha in the ceremony and served to people in attendance. A legend has it that on the day Buddha was born, nine dragons poured Amrita over him; ama-cha is substituted for Amrita in Japan.

In Korean tea, Hydrangea serrata (hangul:산수국 hanja:) is used for an herbal tea called sugukcha (수국차) or ilsulcha (이슬차).

The pink hydrangea has risen in popularity all over the world, but especially in Asia. Pink hydrangeas have many different meanings, but generally mean, “You are the beat of my heart,” as described by the celebrated Asian florist Tan Jun Yong, where he was quoted saying, “The light delicate blush of the petals reminds me of a beating heart, while the size could only match the heart of the sender!”[11]

FFF

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Cheers

Phoneography Challenge: Macro

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Good morning from a another damp Hastings day.

What else to do when there is nothing on TV but play around with my phone and photo editing apps.  At least that is what I did last night.   I read about a new app yesterday in my reader so found it last night and played around with it.  Those I will show later.

Anyway this week the challenge is macro.  I have seen some really awesome posts so far this morning.

So here are mine.  They have all been edited with Snapseed.  I am really impressed with the camera on the 5S. It is really sharp and the zoom on it is great.

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This is another photo taken at the same time as my post last Friday in the Look Up, Look Down challenge.

Then I found some small hydrangeas that were interesting both from the front and back of the blooms.

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I have no idea what flower this is but it came out well.

Here are the other great posts I read this morning.

http://lensandpensbysally.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/phoneography-and-non-slr-digital-devices-photo-challenge-macro-topography-of-seasonings-going-on-holiday/

http://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/phoneography-and-non-slr-digital-devices-photo-challenge-macro-up-close-in-the-kitchen/

http://completelydisappear.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/hello-stranger/

http://piecesofstarlight.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/phoneography-topography-of-sweet-opportunities-to-hop/

Thank you for visiting and thanks for all the wonderful comments yesterday.  I really appreciate them all.

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Final watermark for blog

Pretty in Pink

Page 51

 

Good morning from a beautiful sunny Hastings this morning.

Yesterday I was feeling a bit blue with the America’s Cup result so while I was working on my digital scrapbooking last night I decided to cheer myself up with the colour pink.

On the other side of Cornwall Park there is an absolutely gorgeous garden full of peonies and poppies.  It is so alive with vibrant colours.  Roses are my favourite flowers but I have fallen in love with peonies.  They are such magnificent flower just bursting with life.  Of course I have taken a lot of photos there.

With the background paper I used a close up of this magnificent specimen in the photo and edited it with photoshop.

Pink Peony

I didn’t do too much to the image as I wanted the pinkness to be kept as well as the details of the petals.

Pink and Purple Hydrangeas

 

Coming back through the park there is a greenhouse or winter garden which is used to grow the plants for the various gardens around the park.  At the moment it is filled with hydrangeas and gerberas.  Close up shots of tightly packed petals make great papers as well which I used here as an accent paper.

Finally I added the embellishments which I created from other photos.

Pink peonies doublepeonie buds 2Purple peonie

 

I felt for the font it needed to be rather traditional so I used the Great Victorian Swashed font.

It certainly brightened up my night doing this page.

Cheers and have a nice day.

Raewyn