Animal Friend of the Week: A Rothschild Giraffe

 

 

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The Rothschild’s giraffe was first named and described by Lord Walter Rothschild, a pasisonate zoologist and member of the Rothschild family. Lord Rothschild described his giraffe following an expedition to East Africa in the early 1900s.
The Rothschild’s giraffe is sometimes also known as the Baringo giraffe or the Ugandan giraffe.he wild

Facts about the Rothschild Giraffe

In the Wild

IUCN: Endangered

The Rothschild’s Giraffe is one of the most endangered subspecies, with only a few hundred remaining in Kenya and Uganda as a result of mass deforestation.

You can help protect their wild homes by purchasing sustainable timber and paper products marked with the FSC (Forestry Stewardship Council) logo.

So sad that this majestic and beautiful animal is on the verge of extinction.  It makes me angry when I see photos of young teenagers shooting any giraffes for that matter for sport.  Time to stop this barbaric practice.  Future generations will only know that these graceful creatures by photos.

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: A Sumatran Tiger

 

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In the wild

IUCN: Critically endangered

Tigers are solitary animals, with males and females only coming together for mating. Cubs stay with their mother and have no contact with their father.

Sumatran Tigers are the smallest of the five remaining sub-species, and are found on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. They are critically endangered due to habitat loss and illegal hunting, and there are believed to be less than 500 surviving in the wild.

Wellington Zoo is proud to support 21st Century Tiger, a zoo-based conservation initiative that supports wild tiger populations around the world.

 

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: A Regal Cheetah

A Regal Cheetah-

 

Cheetah are best known for their incredible speeds and are able to reach 100kph in 3 seconds. Their bodies are well adapted for this: they have non-retractable claws, a long heavy tail to help with turning, and they’re much leaner than other big cats.

In the wild 

IUCN: Vulnerable

Cheetah may be fast, but they’re non-confrontational animals and regularly have their kills stolen by other big cats.

They’re also incredibly vulnerable to conflict with farmers, as they are seen as a threat to their livestock and can be shot as a result.

Wellington Zoo contributes to their conservation by supporting Cheetah Outreach’s Livestock Guarding Dog Project – an initiative that works to resolve Cheetah and human conflict in South African farmlands by training Anatolian Shepherd Dogs to chase wild Cheetah away from the livestock they protect, ensuring the cats’ survival.

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.

Animal Friend of the Week: Sun Conures

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Sun Conures are very social and are known for their very loud squawks and screams compared to their comparatively small size – so you’ll probably hear them when you’re out and about in the Zoo.

Some of our flock were hand-reared after being rejected by their mother, andhese birds in particular are very friendly with the staff who raised them.

In the wild

IUCN: Endangered

Sun Conures, also known as Sun Parakeets, are native to northeastern South America. They form monogamous pairs as young as four months old, live in large flocks, and can live up to 30 years.

Their bright and beautiful colouring, combined with their intelligence and curious temperaments, make Sun Conures popular pets.

Unfortunately, they are now endangered and in decline primarily due to excessive trapping for the pet trade – which means that there are more Sun Conures living as pets than in the wild. They are now protected under the Wild Bird Conservation Act which bans the importation of wild–caught birds, and conservationists hope this will help to increase their numbers in the wild.

Wellington Zoo

Animal Friend of the Week Challenge Logo-

I want to showcase our animal kingdom.  It runs from Tuesday New Zealand time and is weekly.  You can join in anytime at all over the week.  You can post your furry friends (babies), wild animals, birds, insects and butterflies.  Even reptiles are welcome.

Just use this logo and link back to this blog.

I look forward to seeing all the different animals around the world

Thanks for visiting.